Do you want to be a goose or a crab?

It’s interesting sometimes to look at how animals behave. Take the crab and the goose, for example.

You can put several crabs in a small bucket, maybe 10 inches deep or so, something they could easily climb out of. But it’s interesting to watch them, one crab will try to reach up and pull itself out of the bucket and the others will grab hold of it and pull him back in. The next will try to climb out, but again, the others will grab hold and pull it back into the bucket. So it will go as long as they’re all in that bucket. Reaching up, getting pulled back.

Now, if we look at the goose, we see something different. When geese fly together, they fly in a “V” shape. Biologists have determined that the V-shaped formation that geese use when migrating serves two important purposes:

First, it conserves their energy. Each bird flies slightly above the bird in front of him, resulting in a reduction of wind resistance. The birds take turns being in the front, falling back when they get tired. In this way, the geese can fly for a long time before they must stop for rest.

The second benefit to flying in the “V” formation is that it is easy to keep track of every bird in the group. Flying in formation also makes it easier for the geese to communicate and coordinate within the group where they’re going and when to stop and rest or feed.

So today’s question is: Do you want to be a goose or a crab?

Author: Matt

Just your average computer and security geek in North Carolina, writing about the world as I see it. I also like to travel and be outdoors, trying to get back into hiking and camping again, so we'll see how that goes.

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